Looking for the Blessing in Hard Things

 Looking for the Blessing   in Hard Things   As I listened to the robotic voice I heard, “As of Dec. 31, 2019,

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your health insurance has been cancelled.” So the rumors were true. Our area had been dropped from coverage.

As I kept listening, I had to choose from a menu of options, which seemed like gibberish to me. The one that I needed was to talk to a representative who was not a robot. I picked a number and said, “I need… to talk…to a… representative.” That request seemed too complicated for my robot friend. So I said loudly into the mic, “representative!”

That put me in touch with a human who decided, after I started to

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explain, that I should be transferred to a more local agent. “Oh No! Transferred?” I heard the noxious music starting and waited…

Nick (I always get their names) came back on the line and said he had connected with my local agent who could help. The conversation that ensued wasn’t what I expected. She (Marina) didn’t much care to hear from me or have the information I wanted to know. “You were sent a letter on Dec. 7 that advised you of this action and options you could take,” she said.

“What letter?” Nothing came to mind, but then it was the busy holiday rush. So, she located a copy and read, “Dear Beth…” When she got to the part about my health group being terminated, it was obvious this was just a boiler plate version, not one intended for just me and my immediate circumstance.

I now had 60 days to fix this somehow and it seemed I was to start with an impersonal website with the hope I could get specific

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answers, or go to the “Medicare National Sales Dept.” Yikes! The black hole of government bureaucracy. I’m doomed! Marina didn’t listen to my protests, but merely repeated what she had covered during the call and asked, “Is there anything else I can help you with today?” (She didn’t want to hear my reply.)

Since Dave was at an important appointment in the city and didn’t pick up when I called, I remembered what most people do: I texted him. Yes, a short, plaintive cry to intervene in this misery. A couple sentences alerting him it was his turn at bat.

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By the time he got home, I had done what I had promised myself in the New Year. I chose to look for the blessing in hard things. Here’s what I came up with:

  1. Identify the struggle and the stress: I had an unexpected turn of events that were out of my control and couldn’t connect with someone who cared to clarify a true solution. (In fact, she couldn’t clarify who was responsible or why this happened.) 
  2. Admit helpless feelings of desperation, inadequacy, resentment, and so on…(Both of us have had some serious health events in the past and needed reliable coverage.)
  3. Bring God into it. He’s part of this day with me and knows more about this than anyone concerned. Acknowledge His power to work and show me a way through, even while I wait in confusion.
  4. Step back and see the blessing: A. I had found out about the problem and had time to call (on a week day during business hours) for some answers right then. B. I figured out from my insurance card who to contact at first. C. I remembered about texting, rather than frantically calling Dave 10 X with no response. D. I could just wait for further guidance and go about my day accomplishing other things I cared about.

When Dave got home he had done some great legwork and found additional information I could be blessed by:

  1. Our health group was proactive in securing an acceptable option without our striking out on our own. (I had visions of “Affordable Health Care and sky-high premiums.)
  2. Dave also found out who was responsible for this development, which surprised me. It wasn’t what “Marina” had said.
  3. This dilemma didn’t drag out very long and didn’t put us in jeopardy, as it seemed.

At the risk of giving too much information about a personal issue, I’m sharing this to present a process toward adopting a new habit for any who care to try it. “Be Blessed,” regardless of daily irritations or seemingly monumental developments. Let me review:

  1. Step back and take a breath, as you go after a solution– in God’s presence
  2. He planned for your day to include this so stay focused, though it’s frustrating to work with strangers on a personal matter.
  3. Begin to let the Spirit share the blessing in this circumstance and calm your heart. Deliverance is in process.
  4. We don’t have to get our way, or abuse people who aren’t helpful. We trust…and let God put us in a different place with Him.
  5. Human weakness is exposed by such events, ours and others’. But we’re not helpless, and we will see His hand.
  6. Let God put the pieces together and lead where He wants it to go. He knows the source of the issue and the path toward resolution.

So, in 2020, join me in this new outlook of finding the blessing in hard things. And, we’ll have more to praise the Almighty for, as well as see growth in our own lives.

By : Beth Weikel /April 13, 2020 /By His Design Blog, Uncategorized /Comments Off on Looking for the Blessing in Hard Things

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  • About By His Design

    Dave and Beth Weikel have worked in full-time ministry, business, and public education for over 30 years. God is using their season of loss to provide hope and healing for others.
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